Basilica of SS. Ulrich and Afra in Augsburg

The Basilica of SS. Ulrich and Afra (German: Basilika SS. Ulrich and Afra) is a Catholic parish in Augsburg, Bavaria, which originated from the Roman tomb of St. Afra, which was martyred in year 304. The building is a great example of Gothic architecture in Germany. In its interior it conserves three enormous and very precious altars of Renaissance considered a masterpiece of the German sculpture of the period. Its high bell tower with an “onion”, which dominates the city of the south, served like prototype for the construction of numerous baroque towers of Bavaria.

In 1577 (officially) and 1643-1644 (virtually) the church, which was called the Benedictine abbey of Saints Ulrich and Afra was elevated to the rank of imperial abbey. On October 18, 1777, a Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart organ concert was held. On May 4, 1782, Pope Pius VI celebrated Mass in Basilica. Secularized in 1802, it entered the possession of the State of Bavaria. In 1810 the church was elevated to parish and from July 4, 1937, declared by Pope Pius XI, a minor basilica and finally on May 4, 1987 was visited by Pope John Paul II.

The whole history of the Basilica of SS. Ulrich and Afra is simply too long to write here, on the bottom you will find the link to official site if you want to find out more about the evolution of architecture through the years. For now, look at these pictures and then, as soon as you are close to Augsburg come and visit this magnificence!

A view from the north.

 

North side closeup.

 

Organ.

 

A monster eating a baby. Nothing to see here folks, move along.

 

 

 

Tomb of St. Ulrich.

 

 

A different approach to the Last Supper.

 

Hard to imagine better place to cool down after a long sightseeing.

 

Side altar.

 

Ignore my sister and pay attention to the details above.

 

Ceiling so high you can almost see the clouds forming 😀

 

Pope was here before I was even born.

 

This tower is one of the trademarks of Augsburg.

 

Info Box
Condition:Excellent
Open for public:Yes, free entry and you can leave a donation or buy a souvenir
Opening hours:Monday - Saturday: 11:00 h - 17:00 h
Sunday: 11:30 h - 17:00 h
Location:
Sources:

Wikipedia.org, This site.

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